An Analyzation of Socrates’ Argument: No One Desires Something He or She Believes To Be Bad

In Plato's Meno, Socrates contends that 'no one desires something he or she believes to be bad' (77e).  Socrates' argument is as follows (starting at 78a): 1. Everyone knows that if something is bad it’s harmful. 2. So to want something you believe is bad as such involves wanting to be harmed. 3. But no…

The Philosophical Life In Plato’s ‘Apology’

In Plato’s Apology, Socrates asserts that if the jury were to let him off on the condition that he stop philosophizing, he would nevertheless disobey the order and continue philosophizing.  Socrates maintains this position because he believes that virtue and care of the soul should be one’s primary concern in life.  Socrates claims that “the…

‘The Defense of Palamedes’ — A Rhetorical Analysis

Plato defined rhetoric, along with its chief proponent, Gorgias, as a shadow discipline, or ‘experiential knack’ (Gorgias, 463c), that is a phantom counterpart to philosophy. In this paper, though, I will look at Gorgias and sophistical argumentation without Plato’s prejudicial lens. This is not a paper about what constitutes sophistry or rhetoric in contrast to…

Jenefer Robinson On Listening With Emotion

Jenefer Robinson holds that feeling an emotion is a process which begins with “an affective, non-cognitive evaluation that causes autonomic and motor changes and is succeeded by cognitive monitoring” (Deeper than Reason, 58-59). Moreover, in chapter 12 of Deeper Than Reason, Robinson discusses this position in light of the results of Krumhansl's experiment. In doing so,…

Syntax And Semantics In Searle’s Chinese Room Argument

'The Chinese room argument', as put forth by John Searle, is an argument against Weak AI. I have explained John Searle's Chinese room argument here so I will not take the time to do so again. Rather, I will take the time to explain the difference between Weak AI and Strong AI. Weak AI is the notion that…

A Review Of Catherine Z. Elgin’s ‘Fiction As Thought Experiment’

Dictionary.com defines scientific experiments as “tests under controlled conditions that are made to demonstrate a known truth, examine the validity of a hypothesis, or determine the efficacy of something". In "Thought Experiments", by Roy Sorenson, Sorenson points out that “the aim of any experiment is to answer or raise its question rationally (Sorenson, 205). As…

Avicenna On Self-Awareness (Floating Man Argument)

Avicenna believes intellectual progress is made through finding the linking, or middle terms, of syllogistic arguments. A thought experiment is not in itself a syllogism, but it can prompt one to reflect more effectively and help trigger and intuitive insight of that elusive middle term. More modestly, a thought might just guide one towards the…